physical Capital

Lifestyle Design and Physical Capital

Tim Ferris, the author of The Four-Hour Work Week, has revolutionized idea of work life balance.  The concept of “lifestyle design,” in which a person lives their fantasy while making enough passive income to sustain their quality of life.  Ferris tells a story of him leaving his online supplement business to travel the world. On his travels his revenues went up and he became a salsa dancing champion.

Ferris tells this story, writes it in a book, becomes a best seller for four straight years, and now there is an entire generation of people that think they only need to work four hours a week to be successful.

Wrong. So, so wrong.

Nobody is reading your blog, clicking the affiliate links, and you are going to be hungry.

Over the holiday, I read, “So Good They Can’t Ignore You,” by Cal Newport. The book introduces a topic called, “Career Capital.” Career capital is an idea that in order to control your own destiny, you must be so good at what you do that you become irreplaceable. Your skill set is so far above and beyond others that you call the shots. This career capital must be developed over time by gaining the trust of people through deliberate practice and quality results. Once this capital is attained, then you have the ability to design your life around this skill set.

The idea of career capital struck a chord with me. It would be terribly unsexy if Tim Ferris told you how hard he had to work to learn internet marketing, get speaking engagements to build a following, and the hundreds of pitches he made to publishers that continuously turned him down.




As the new year turns over, I began to think about the universality of non-monetary capital.

Creating a New Year’s Resolution is a total waste of your time. Statistically, you should not even try.

The reason they do not work is because your resolution is not backed by the capital, practice, or habits needed to make them stick.

Physical Capital, the currency of experiences that allows your body to adapt to a stimulus, is an idea I think we can all learn from.

For many, you have high hopes of losing weight or running a marathon. Unfortunately, there is no physical capital in reserves to make this goal a reality.

Scientifically, your muscle tissue is going to take three months to regenerate strong, healthy tissue. The connective tissues will take around six months and the bone tissue will take over a year. This is physical capital, your body’s ability to adapt to physical challenges. Without the process of developing physical capital the idea of living a healthy life will always be a short-term goal.

This year, focus on making deposits into a bank account of physical capital. Every day, do something that makes you a little stronger and helps you move a little better. By the end of the year, you will have learned about your body, developed strength, understood mobility in joints, and learned how to breathe. That way, when you are ready to run that race, you have a wealth of physical capital waiting for you to succeed.

One reason I love The Low Back Fix so much its progression to building this physical capital. Breath work, flexibility training, and strength work are the foundations to creating physical capital. Instead of giving answers, the program delivers a process. Through process you develop the highest form of capital there is, education.

Happy New Years!!!

Leave a Reply